Archive for the ‘Outreach’ Category

Teacher Institute and Trainings of Summer 2016

September 13th, 2016

Teacher Institute and Trainings 2016
This summer 70 teachers from across the region received environmental education training from the Alice Ferguson Foundation education team in a variety of exciting locations, everywhere from the grounds of the Jefferson Memorial to a pontoon boat on Jug Bay to our very own working farm on the shore of the Potomac River. For many of our teachers turned students, these were opportunities to move from their comfort zone to their “challenge zone”, learning new ways to teach hands on science.

During our two week Teacher Institute with Prince George’s County teachers, staff from across AFF came to speak to our teachers on all of the exciting ways they could bring environmental concepts to life in the classroom. Julia Saintz from our Trash Initiative spoke to the teachers about creating Trash Free Schools and Trash Free Classrooms. Staff from the education team demonstrated multiple ways to teach watershed concepts, first using simple classroom tools and eventually moving outside to teach concepts that could easily be covered on a school’s parking lot or playground. Local experts gave tours of recycling, compost, and waste water treatment facilities that affect the daily lives of these teachers and the students they teach. Farm staff shared their expertise about gardening, soils and other topics that could be shared in the school setting. By the end of the Institute, the teachers became experts in field work, doing water quality testing and making assessments that they could do with their students.

Teachers who were nervous about being outdoors started with hands-on learning of simple lesson plans that could be used in the schoolyard, and over the course of two weeks were empowered to touch benthic macro invertebrates (creek critters), observe wild osprey, as well as kayak and canoe on the river. It was an exciting transformation for the teachers and for the staff who had the privilege of working with them.

With the Bridging the Watershed Teacher Trainings, local teachers met at National Parks to participate in student modules to learn to assess water quality through chemical testing, macro invertebrate sampling, invasive plant identification, and trash studies. They learned about the detrimental effects of human impacts, including marine debris and polluted runoff on drinking water and marine species. Teachers learned ways to bring these studies back to the classroom curriculum and prepare their students for outdoor learning experiences.

The most important part of all AFF education programs is to empower students with ways to have positive human impact on the environment. AFF hopes to model effective teaching on environmental issues by approaching people in their comfort zone and challenging them to learn more, teach more, and get more hands on.

One of our teachers wrote after the institute, “Our knowledge of how we are impacting our planet, and ways to apply science to solve and investigate real world issues was increased tremendously. . . My experience at Hard Bargain Farm was truly special and will inform my instruction and attitude for the years to come.”

Faith In Our Watershed Month – May 2016

May 13th, 2016

Faith In Our Watershed, photo by Bill TownsendTim Murphy, Coordinator, Trash Free Potomac Watershed Initiative, Alice Ferguson Foundation

As I watch the drops of rain fall at the farm today, I am reminded that every molecule of water on the earth has always been here. It exists in our waterways, has seeped into the earth, resurfaced for our needs, and evaporated into the air, only to return again as rain. Refilling my 52 oz water jug from the tap supplied by our well, I start to wonder about all the places these molecules of water might have been.

The 2nd Annual Faith in our Watershed Month is a program sponsored by the Alice Ferguson Foundation. We are encouraging faith communities to consider where our water comes from and the gift it is to all the people of the earth. 2/3 of our body weight is water, making the presence of water the primary factor of human viability. The essential message is that how we treat our water will have a long-term impact on our survival. The actions we are calling for are:

  1. Inspiring your faith community through messages during worship or organized educational activities. We at the Alice Ferguson Foundation are ready as a resource for any programming you want to do.
  2. Take Action by cleaning up the trash in your area. Cleanup activities are listed year round on our Trash Network: trashnetwork.fergusonfoundation.org. You can even organize your own cleanup and list it on the network as well. We can take you through every step. Our Adopt A Litter Can program involves taking ownership of a litter can that we provide, to put in a place that is often littered. This program is getting popular, and proving to be an exceptional solution.
  3. Raise Awareness by posting our litter campaign materials. We can provide you with free promotional materials that are proven to reduce littering.

For more information on Faith in our Watershed Month, contact us: [email protected]

Mallows Bay Cleanup Volunteers Remove 4.84 Tons of Trash

May 13th, 2016

Mallows Bay Cleanup, Photo by Adirenne FarfallaThe 28th Annual Potomac River Watershed Cleanup was April 16, 2016. AFF supported hundreds of cleanups all over the region from DC, MD, VA, to WV. Among the cleanup sites was Mallows Bay. Mallows Bay has recently passed the nomination process to become a National Marine Sanctuary and will be entering the next phase of designation involving a highly participatory and transparent public review process. 

Over 150 people volunteered at the cleanup, removing a total of 4.84 tons of trash!

Representing AFF were staff members Karen Jensen Miles, Adrienne Farfalla and Board of Directors Member Liz Theobalds. The site leader at Mallows Bay was Sammy Orlando from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Also in attendance was Charles County Commissioner Ken Robinson, Tom Roland. Chief of Parks & Grounds, Don Shomette, author of Ghost Fleet of Mallows Bay, Susan Langley, Chief Underwater Archaeologist for the State of Maryland, Mary Groves with MD DNR Smallwood State park, Nick Kuttner with the Potomac Riverkeeper Network, Charlie Stek, Chair of the Mallows Bay- Potomac River Community group, Dave Howe and the team from Institute of Maritime History, Judy Lathrop’s Atlantic Kayak Company, and the Nanjemoy Fire and Rescue team. These volunteers freely engaged the cleanup participants in wonderful stories about the sunken vessels and ecological treasures in the bay.

Tim Emhoff from Nanjemoy Creek and Adrienne Farfalla from the Alice Ferguson Foundation lead education programs with fourth grade students from Gale-Bailey Elementary School after the cleanup on activities such as; Who Polluted the Potomac, and Trash Timeline.

AFF Hosts Annual Garden Party & Wine Tasting

July 2nd, 2015

Alice Ferguson Foundation hosted its Annual Garden Party and Wine Tasting evegarden-party-eve-croppednt on June 19th. This event was sponsored in partnership with the Prince George’s Economic Development Corporation (EDC). Among the more than 100 attendees were leadership from the Prince George’s County EDC, two MD cabinet secretaries, two heads of local jurisdictional Departments of the Environment, the Chair of the County Council, and many esteemed members of the local community, businesses, and nonprofits. Guests mingled on the hilltop for an evening of delicious food, drinks, and live music. It was our pleasure to feature some of Prince George’s County’s finest businesses as we offered specialty chocolates generously provided by SPAGnVOLA, as well as a variety of wines from Romano Vineyard and Winery, in addition to a selection of artisanal wines created by AFF Board President Dan Jackson.

The Foundation’s Hard Bargain Farm Environmental Center offered the perfect setting and served as a compelling reminder of AFF’s mission to connect people to the natural world by providing environmental education experiences to the students of Prince George’s County and the Washington, DC metropolitan region. We invite you to learn more about the Foundation’s events and news and join our community of members and to support our efforts.

Our guiding principles of education, inspiration and innovation were front and center throughout the evening, particularly with opportunities to tour the nearly completed first phase of our upgraded education buildings. Our Potomac Watershed Study Center (PWSC), one of just a handful of building sites in the world that fully embrace the Living Building Challenge ©, will serve as a valuable teaching tool and resource for business leaders, community members, students and teachers alike. We invite you to learn more about this ground breaking project and to become involved.

Potomac River Watershed Cleanup at Riley’s Lock

April 21st, 2015

By Hannah Seligman, Intern, Trash Free Potomac Watershed Initiative

The Potomac River offers fun, healthy, and educational adventures, and each April the Alice Ferguson Foundation partners with hundreds of local community groups to clean up the watershed during our annual Potomac Cleanup. As part of our cleanup events this year, I participated in the Riley’s Lock Cleanup on the C&O Canal. Kay Fulcomer, a longtime river activist, has led a cleanup here for eight consecutive years. Calleva Outdoors Education provided canoes, life jackets, and paddles for volunteers, and AFF provided gloves and large, heavy duty bags for trash and recycling.

reillys lock 2We launched our canoes from the Seneca Landing boat ramp around 10am and spread across Seneca Creek, the mouth of the Potomac River, and downriver to Violettes Lock. After about three hours on the water we collected 17 full bags of trash, 12 full bags of recyclables (the bulk being plastic or glass beverage bottles), one mini refrigerator, one fifty-five gallon barrel, fishing hooks and lures, one tire, one steel lunch tray, sports balls and lots of Styrofoam. The C&O Canal National Historic Park kindly assists us in disposal of all trash. Jim Heins of the C&O Canal Association – also a leader of several cleanup sites – personally sorts through the recycling bags to ensure that they will be approved at the recycling facility.

Crawling along the banks of the river, reaching to pick up trash, brought me a huge surge of inspiration and joy. Despite the thick bugs I knew I would swallow if I opened my mouth, I could not convince my muscles otherwise. I was smiling and motivated from the feeling of community. I’ve been an intern with the AFF since March, and my goal for this internship is to connect as many people as possible to their local watershed and to promote a sense of belonging to encourage community rapport. Ultimately, I would like to see cleanups be closely affiliated with ecology education to further engage youth.

Reilly lock 1Every action on land will affect the river, and it’s time to awaken our awareness to consumption patterns. The banks along the waterways constantly collect debris. Natural strainers in the water, such as tree matter and broken branches, also accumulate trash floating in the river. Trash is deadly to wildlife and increases toxins to be filtered out of our drinking water. Here are some ways to be part of the solution: Take control; take care of your trash. Do not litter and report any illegal dumping to your county or other jurisdiction. Make sure your trash and recycling receptacles have a secure lid and are not overflowing when you put them on the street for pickup. Volunteer at a community cleanup! “The Potomac River naturally brings good people together,” said Cleanup leader Fulcomer, and The Riley’s Lock Cleanup was a successful community event. Volunteers included community residents, Potomac River Keeper Dean Naujoks, the Canoe Cruisers Association, the Monocacy Canoe Club, Blue Ridge Voyageurs, Seneca Creek Watershed Partners, the Muddy Branch Alliance, Calleva Outdoors, and Montgomery Parks. Thank you to everyone who came out to make a difference and beautify our local waterways! It’s never too late to get involved. Our ultimate goal is a Trash Free Potomac. Contact [email protected] or 301-292-5665 to learn more and find out about upcoming events.

AFF’s Newest Trash Free School: in their own words

January 27th, 2015

Guest blog post by Maurice Collier-Shabazz and the rest of the Green Team at Phyllis E. Williams Elementary School

Phyllis E. Williams Elementary SchoolGoing Green…
 
This school year Phyllis E. Williams Elementary School decided to participate in the Maryland Green School Project and Alice Ferguson Foundation’s (AFF) Trash Free School Project. These projects help us focus and take action on a few community-wide issues. These issues include recycling, solid waste reduction, water conservation/pollution prevention, energy conservation and habitat restoration. The school saw a community need and decided to create an action plan to help combat what was deemed to be an environmental problem.

The first step in our going green process has been to set up a successful recycling program as well as participating in the Trash Free School Project. Our students and parents have stepped up to the challenge to sign the Trash Free Lunch pledge, which takes place on Thursdays. Our focus in going green is to lower our waste as a school and focusing on the 3 R’s- Rethink, Reduce and Reuse.

The students of Phyllis E. Williams have taken the lead in the creation of the Going Green initiative. The after-school program led the initiative to start the recycling program by managing the disposal of all recyclables collected during the school day. The Student Government and Honor Society are supporting our green movement by creating posters to reinforce the schools message regarding the recycling and trash free programs.

Phyllis E. Williams is currently partnering with the Alice Ferguson Foundation and MAEOE (Maryland Association for Environmental and Outdoor Education) to assist our school to become a certified Green School within the next year or so. Looking ahead, Phyllis E. Williams will have a Green School Kick Off Celebration that will include representatives from Pepco, WSSC (Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission), and AFF to address the importance of energy conservation and maintaining a trash-free watershed.

For more information on Trash Free Schools click here.
For more information on Maryland Green Schools click here.

Why I Give

December 16th, 2014

Dan Jackson and familyBy Dan Jackson, Alice Ferguson Foundation Board President

It is that time of year again when many people start to think about monetary donations to help reduce income tax liability. However, many of us also think about charitable donations, throughout the year. I am listing six reasons I choose to donate both money, and time, to AFF on a regular basis. In no particular order:

  1. I believe 100% in AFF’s mission

    To me, there is nothing better than supporting an organization that opens minds of all ages to nature’s tune on a 300-acre working farm. I am so proud to represent and serve an organization that advocates for environmental, agricultural, and cultural education, stewardship of resources, trash-free schools and businesses, and healthy waterways and woodlands.

  2. AFF has helped me build stronger bonds with family and friends

    Since my first affiliation with AFF in 2000, Hard Bargain Farm has been and continues to be a bonding place for me, especially with my sons. They were 10 and 8 when we first helped Eileen Watts milk Marmalade, feed the cattle, and pick eggs. Since then we’ve spent many days and nights at the Farm and have often been joined by friends and extended family who have also embraced how special the Farm is and have appreciated AFF’s work.

  3. My involvement with AFF has helped me develop and refine skills

    As one who takes a strong interest in sharpening the saw, I volunteer to hone existing skills and learn new ones. Volunteering and Board leadership is an opportunity for me to learn from individuals I may not meet otherwise, to find common bonds, and develop more business acumen as we dig deep into strategic and operational issues that guide the organization. What I gain is a greater understanding of common goals, a respect for others, and perspective.

  4. I follow a legacy of service by working with AFF

    My Mom and Dad have been volunteers for as long as I can remember in one form or another. At the moment, they’re heavily involved in several organizations including Montgomery Village Kiwanis and The Miracle League Montgomery County, MD. My sons are following – partially because it’s a highly worthy school requirement, but also because they see what we get out of the experiences. They started young and I expect they’ll continue to serve. I truly hope they’ll find the same level of satisfaction as I have found by working with AFF.

  5. I meet and work with amazing people through AFF

    It begins with AFF staff and leadership and extends to Board, volunteers, and community members. The folks affiliated with AFF are amazing and dedicated to the organization, Hard Bargain Farm, the area’s rich history, and preserving the awesome sense of place. This dedication and caliber of people inspires me to continue my affiliation with AFF.

  6. My efforts through AFF are sincerely appreciated

    From the time I first signed-up as a volunteer stream clean-up leader to serving in my current role as Board President, I’ve always felt that my contributions have been welcomed and valued no matter the amount of time I’ve given, the big or small ideas shared, or the amount of money I’ve contributed. This has not always been the case with other organizations for which I’ve served. I believe this treatment is a testament to AFF’s greatness.

Urban Plight to Agricultural Delight

December 12th, 2014
Urban Farm Site Before BAIBLocated on 32nd and Branch Ave in Temple Hills, MD is a 5,000 square foot abandoned street scape project that has existed since 1974. Thirty years later this forgotten site, a road that literally led nowhere, will be the future home for an urban farm thanks to an initiative spearheaded by Branch Avenue In Bloom (BAIB). Since 2010 BAIB, a program of the Maryland Small Business Development Center, has been coordinating with the local businesses and community residents to revitalize the Branch Avenue commercial corridor. BAIB has partnered with the Alice Ferguson Foundation’s Trash Free Potomac Watershed Initiative to address litter in their community with the Regional Litter Prevention Campaign and through community cleanups.

Urban Farm Real Time Map

Urban Farm Renderings InteriorThe urban farm will have 20 raised beds where participants will have the freedom to plant crops of their choice as well as have over 20 fruit trees, including peach, plum, pomegranate, fig, and persimmon. The farm will give the local community an opportunity to grow their own food and eat healthier. This is especially important in the Branch Avenue corridor, which is considered a food desert, an area where there aren’t any grocery stores nearby. The farm will also serve as a shared community space that will feature urban farming entrepreneurial training, stormwater management awareness, hands on educational opportunities for area schools, jazz shows, movies, and other related outdoor activities. We can’t wait to see how the urban farm will impact and empower the local community.

Urban Farm Renderings Outlay Part 2What originally started off as an idea incepted in 2011 to transform the physical appearance of Branch Avenue, has since transformed into a project that affects the public health and environmental spectrums of the local area and the state. In 2012 BAIB discovered that stormwater runs off the site into a local stream, Oxon Run, which is behind the farm. This stormwater runoff carries pollutants, such as litter and nitrogen, which contaminate Oxon Run. BAIB decided to incorporate stormwater management strategies into their schematics to address the problem. As Oxon Run empties into the Potomac River and ultimately the Chesapeake Bay, the urban farm will not only help to build community, revitalize the business corridor, and address a food desert, but will work to protect our environment and the region’s waterways.

To follow the progress of the Branch Avenue Urban Farm, please visit the www.branchavenueinbloom.org. If you have any questions, BAIB can be reached at [email protected] and/or (301)-702-2250.

To learn more about where your stormwater goes, explore this map of bags of trash collected at community cleanups in the Washington, DC area. If you zoom into your location, you can use the “Flow Path Tool” to figure out where your stormwater goes and the “Upstream Area Tool” to figure out what areas drain towards you. Both these tools are under the “Draw Tools” menu listed on the right of the map.

Celebrating 60 Years of Service to Our Community

October 24th, 2014

By Lori Arguelles, AFF Executive Director

It was 60 years ago today that the pioneers of the Alice Ferguson Foundation (AFF) realized the first fruits of their labors. On October 24, 1954 the Articles of Incorporation for the Foundation were approved and AFF was “born.” This momentous act has had lasting impact during the last six decades including:

– Serving more than 300,000 students through our environmental education programs at our Hard Bargain Farm Environmental Center and in national and state parks through our Bridging the Watershed Program.

alice henry – Engaging more than 130,000 volunteers in the annual Potomac River Watershed Cleanup by removing more than 7 million pounds of debris over the past 26 years.

– Leading the way in energy efficient and green building design by embracing the Living Building Challenge © as we construct and renovate buildings on our educational campus. The net-zero energy, net-zero water, and zero-waste criteria, combined with carbon-neutral and non-toxic, non-polluting component requirements make this a ground-breaking and landscape-altering undertaking.

Throughout the decades, the Foundation has stayed true to its guiding principles of education, inspiration, and innovation. And the impact is both deep-rooted and widespread as evidenced by the experience of one 10-year old student from Heather Hills Elementary School:

“I couldn’t wait until my overnight trip to Hard Bargain Farm. My first activity was a hike through the woods. We learned about pollution and how it harms living organisms. That one hike changed my whole point of view about the environment. In the future I see myself stopping someone from littering to protect the animals and nature.”

Surely our namesake, Alice Ferguson, would appreciate how her vision of a special place in nature has been embraced by student and adult learners alike. And we are proud that Alice’s vision for Hard Bargain Farm has been recognized as nationally significant. Just in time for our Diamond Jubilee celebration the Farm was selected for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places. This prestigious roster is the official list of the Nation’s historic places worthy of preservation. As anniversary gifts go, this is definitely a gem!IMG_0486
But the greatest gift of all is the privilege of sharing the wonder and beauty of nature with a child for the first time. Nothing can match the eye-opening and often life-changing experiences that come from this connection. We couldn’t do any of this without the generous support of friends like you. Thank you for helping us to make a difference!
If you’d like to make a special gift in honor of our anniversary, please visit our donation page. Thank you for your support, and Happy Anniversary!

And the Winner Is… Walker Mill Middle School

December 13th, 2013

By Everette Bradford, Community Outreach Liaison

Walker Mill Middle School officially adopted the Trash Free Schools project in the fall of the 2012-2013 school year, which gave momentum for the school to create a green team to tackle various environmental issues around the school including recycling and reducing waste.  Sidney Bailey, the founder of Walker Mill’s Green Team and claims that it was the motivation of the students and their will to recycle more that led him to join the Trash Free Schools project and create the green team.  Since its inception, the Green Team has been a rapidly growing entity at Walker Mill, where the students and teachers drive environmental stewardship and education through the hallways of the school.

Even though Mr. Bailey is no longer at Walker Mill Middle School, the project by no means is suffering. This year’s Green Team Leader, Mrs. Keisha Bennaugh is heading up the project and taking it in the right direction. The Green Team has doubled in size this past year and now has more than 100 students and multiple teachers. The students will continue recruit new members and teachers until they reach the goal of having school-wide participation in their efforts.

To help with their recruitment efforts, Mrs. Bennaugh brings her eclectic and artsy vibe to enhance the “green-movement” at the school. Students on the Green Team have worked with Mrs. Bennaugh to put fashionable flair on their Green Team attire,  which they are allowed to wear outside on their uniforms on Fridays. She also worked with the students to  create a large “green” mural in the schools media center. Along with encouraging creativity, the Green Team faculty also  challenge the students to take responsibility and work on professionalism and hospitality skills as they work to haul the schools recyclables from the school’s classrooms and offices.

DSC_0239

The Alice Ferguson Foundation’s Executive Director, Lori Arguelles, addresses the Green Team during the ceremony.

In addition to the great work that is taking place in the school, on November 15, 2013, the Green Team was awarded with their $1000 Grand Prize for winning the Alice Ferguson Foundation’s Litter Prevention Video Contest. The school hosted a small ceremony in the media center that included guest speaker such as;Lori Arguelles, Executive Director of the Alice Ferguson Foundation; Mayor Kito James, Town of Capitol Heights; Sidney Bailey, former Green Team Leader and Vice Principal at Center City PCS; and Angela Angle, Policy Aide, Office of Prince Georges County Council Member Derrick L. Davis. Walker Mill Middle School was also presented with Certificates of Appreciation from the Town of Capitol Heights and County Council Member Derrick L. Davis.

The Green Team will utilize their prize money to research and retrofit the school with plants that will improve the indoor air quality. The students also have a desire to procure more recycling bins for classrooms and the hallways and begin greening and planting exercises on the schools exterior. Other future projects for the Green Team include creating a central meeting location for the Green Team, joining in on the Anacostia River Restoration Project efforts, and looking to host a trash free carnival. In the meantime, the Green Team will begin planning activities for the annual Potomac River Watershed School-Yard Cleanup and continually seek more funding sources to complete their projects.