Archive for the ‘Trash Initiative’ Category

The Maryland Push to Ban Styrofoam

February 2nd, 2017
by Laura Cattell Noll, Assistant Program Manager

In the last decade, communities throughout the Potomac River Watershed have taken substantive action to prevent litter, clean up communities and protect the water we drink.  Local jurisdictions in the Washington DC region have been national leaders in disposable bag laws, polystyrene foam bans and innovative social marketing campaigns.

The Maryland General Assembly is looking at the successes of these local jurisdictions and considering a state-wide ban on polystyrene. Commonly known as Styrofoam, polystyrene use poses risks to human health and threatens our drinking water.

Volunteer in yellow jacket carries beach-ball sized chunk of styrofoam away from the river.

A volunteer carries a large block of Styrofoam found on the shore of the Potomac River during a cleanup.

When hot food or beverages are placed in polystyrene food containers, they can leach toxic chemicals directly into our food. Scientists have found that most Americans have residues of these chemicals in their bodies. Because it is lightweight and floats, discarded polystyrene containers are often carried by runoff to storm drains and eventually  end up in local waterways. Over time, the polystyrene breaks into small pieces, but never decomposes. These small pieces absorb chemicals from the water and are readily ingested by fish.

For the last 29 years, the Alice Ferguson Foundation has organized the Annual Potomac River Watershed Cleanup in collaboration with hundreds of partners throughout the region. Since its inception, more that 150,000 volunteers have removed more than 7 million pounds of trash. Our volunteers have consistently found that polystyrene food containers represent a significant portion of the trash in our communities and waterways.

Together we can make polystyrene a thing of the past! What will you do to help?

  • Call your legislator and tell them you support Senate Bill 186 and House Bill 229.
  • Pledge to go foam free by bringing your own reusable coffee mug.
  • Sign-up to volunteer for clean land, safe water and healthy communities.

 

 

2016 in Review: What’s going on in the Trash World?

January 24th, 2017
by Julia Saintz, Community Outreach Coordinator

 

At the beginning of a new year, we pause to reflect on recent successes of the Alice Ferguson Foundation’s Trash Free Potomac Watershed Initiative.  This past year was filled with proud moments for environmental educators, litter fanatics, and volunteers in action.

Keeping the conversation going

A little over a decade ago, we launched a multi-jurisdictional, region-wide conversation about the issue of trash with the first ever Trash Summit. As a result, more than 100 officials signed a treaty pledging their commitment to the issue.  Spring 2016 saw the 10th annual trash summit, Transforming Communities, which convened nearly 200 community members and representatives to talk about the issue of trash in the region’s waterways and what can be done about it. In the fall, just a little over a decade after the first Trash Treaty was signed, officials from the District of Columbia, Prince George’s County and Montgomery County came together to renew their commitment with the Anacostia River Accord. 

Officials at table shake hands after signing the Anacostia Accord.

 

Inspired by our volunteers

Each April, we celebrate Earth Month with an enormous region-wide cleanup effort. In 2016, our team helped organize more than 9,400 volunteers for the Potomac River Watershed Cleanup who removed more than 330,000 pounds of trash at 265 sites! Volunteers from across four states and the District of Columbia came out to clean up their neighborhoods, roads, parks, and waterways. Even after three decades of organizing this event, the passion and community commitment to our environment and waterways continues to inspire.

Group of kids in bright yellow vests roll a discarded tire out of the woods and towards a road.

 

Youth and leadership

This summer, we also launched the Watershed Leadership Program, which teaches young people about the watershed, the importance of proper waste management and how to lead a successful watershed cleanup. The program engaged youth from the Student Conservation Association and the Green Zone Environmental Program of the Department of Energy and the Environment in the District of Columbia. This program joins initiatives like Trash Free Schools and Trash Free Classrooms in working to engage the next generation and give them the tools to make a green difference in their community.

Three children sit on playground fence holding bright yellow trash bags.

 

Keep an eye out for more in 2017:

  • In 2016, we continued to refine our litter prevention campaign with brand new social marketing research to help us better reach millennials and Spanish-speakers. What did we find? Messaging focused on healthy communities and drinking water was most effective with those groups. Based on these results, our campaign has been updated and will be unveiled soon!
  • The Alice Ferguson Foundation is excited to partner with Rock Creek Conservancy for a three-year project to create a D.C. Adopt a Stream Program.
  • If you live in DC, you’ll be seeing more of us. This year, our Litter Prevention team will be working in all 8 wards of DC!
  • Keep an eye out for our 11th Annual Trash Summit, coming this autumn.
  • As of January 1, 2017, the District of Columbia joins Prince George’s County in implementing a Foam Ban, requiring food service packaging to be made from recyclable or compostable materials only. This is great news; Styrofoam is one of the most toxic and least degradable plastics out there. Be ready to support upcoming legislation on Foam Bans in other jurisdictions! 

 

Ready to dive into 2017 with us? Sign up for our mailing list to stay on top upcoming events, cleanups, and happenings.

 

 

What can I do about the Foam Ban?

June 7th, 2016

Tim Murphy Coordinator, Trash Free Potomac Watershed Initiative

A major step was taken this year by the District of Columbia and neighboring jurisdictions, Prince George’s County and Montgomery County to ban the use of Styrofoam (Polystyrene) products for businesses that serve food or beverages. The intent is to move consumer usage toward products that are less harmful on the environment. Due to its lightweight nature, foam can be easily blown and washed into local waterways. It is made in such a way that it does not decompose, but breaks apart into small pieces so that it looks like food to the fish and animals that live in and around the water. This then becomes an ingested toxin and has harmful effects on the animal.

There will be a period of time over which the ban will take full effect. Although the responsibility of discontinuing foam products rests on the businesses in the food industry, there are a number of things consumers can do to help get rid of the foam from the environment. Just think of the 4 R’s

Reduce – If you patronize a business continuing to use foam, make the owners aware of the ban. The Department of Energy and Environment seeks to educate and assist with compliance rather than fine businesses for first offenses. See doee.dc.gov/foam for information on compliance and vendors of acceptable alternative products.

Reuse – Although you should make the best efforts to not use foam in the first place, it can find its way into your home as part of shipping or packaging. Rather than throw it away and take up that precious landfill space (remember, foam doesn’t biodegrade like other products will) there are decorative or functional uses for the stuff. I read an interesting post on recyclenation.com that can give you a few ideas.

Rethink- It is becoming more and more popular to carry a reusable drink container with you that you can fill up without using a supplied foam product. If you know you are going to be purchasing food, why not carry your own reusable service items with you. Stick them in your reusable bag and wash them when you get home.

Recycle – Most local waste haulers will not accept Styrofoam due to the cost involved in hauling a high volume lightweight material. It is also less expensive for manufacturers to make new Styrofoam than recycle it. There are, however, local companies that accept clean dry Styrofoam for recycling (EPI Industry Alliance www.epspackaging.org and selected locations of Mom’s Organic Market)  and local shipping companies may accept it to reuse.

It make take a little extra effort on our part, but each step we take brings us closer to sustainable waterways that are safe for drinking, swimming and fishing.

New Litter Prevention Research for the District of Columbia

June 7th, 2016

For over 5 years, The Alice Ferguson Foundation has been addressing the trash problem through The Regional Litter Campaign. Items such as banners, posters and yard signs evoke messages intended to actualize the impact of littering behaviors. Relevant messages include “Your Litter Hits Close to Home” and “Take Control, Take Care of your Trash”. Studying the effectiveness of the campaign through behavior observation and focus groups has given us insight into why people litter and how to promote positive behaviors.

We partnered with the research firm, Opinion Works, to look at selected groups in order to find ways to resonate with Litterers in wards 5-8 in D.C. In our most recent study, the target audiences were millennials (who are in the age demographic most likely to litter) and Spanish Speaking audiences, to determine the effectiveness of the Spanish Litter Prevention Campaign materials recently developed. Some of the findings were:

  1. Litter can be relative and situational depending on the context. Many of the people surveyed live in areas were a great amount of litter is present and therefore perceive one additional piece of litter as inconsequential. Where trash is abundant or there are not enough waste containers, residents tend to rationalize the behavior as outside of their level of concern.
  2. Direct confrontation of littering is met with negativity so it does not diminish littering. The images and wording of the campaign are meant to influence communities with value laden messaging such as, trash increases nuisance animals and reduces property values. A strong connection is made with images of children around litter where a sense of imminent harm and a need for protection. Relating trash to drinking water also has a strong correlation to reducing littering.
  3. The Millennial audience resonated with the campaign hashtag, #DontbeTrashy. The term “Trashy” implies a negative self-image; and, the association with littering behavior is a pairing that brings about a feeling of regret. The hashtag did not fare as well with the Spanish speaking audience as the direct translation of the phrase into Spanish is a little stronger and does not have a similar cultural meaning.

We completed an additional round of behavioral observations in the District of Columbia to track the impact of the presence of campaign materials on littering behavior. The rate of littering behavior since the placement of materials in 2014 had a 31% reduction in littering behavior at the four target areas in wards 5, 6, 7 and 8.

Our work in the District continues with holding cleanups to remove the litter already on the streets and in parks. Daily, we prevent litter with our Litter Prevention Campaign materials and with every new post of litter makes its way into our Potomac.

If you would like to request the littering campaign in your area, e-mail us at [email protected].

Litter Prevention Resources in the District

June 7th, 2016

The Alice Ferguson Foundation’s Litter Prevention Campaign is currently in Wards 5-8. Our outreach efforts have reached out to businesses, neighborhoods, churches, community groups and other nonprofits and District Departments in this area. We have been able to provide groups the general items in our Litter Prevention Toolkit which includes community planning documents, newsletter language, radio PSAs and more.

We have focused our outreach on providing Litter Prevention Posters, Yard Signs and Banners as we have found these materials to be an easy gateway for community members to begin reducing litter. Our materials have changed over the years of the Litter Campaign as we have done more research and heard more feedback. The most recent updates to the Campaign materials are explained in our Blog Post ‘New Litter Prevention Research for the District of Columbia’ with our most recent focus group findings as of May 2016.

In the future we hope to expand our Litter Prevention Campaign to wards 1-8 in the District to increase our impact on litter and reduce the amount of litter in our watershed. With continued support from the District Department of Energy and the Environment, we can help to meet the trash Total Maximum Daily Load for the Anacostia and reduce the pollution of 80% of the regions drinking water; the Potomac River.

The bottom picture is a road in Ward 7 before a cleanup. The top is the road after the cleanup. Our Litter campaign Yard Signs are no up along the road to prevent litter in the future.

Litter Prevention in Ward 7

Faith In Our Watershed Month – May 2016

May 13th, 2016

Faith In Our Watershed, photo by Bill TownsendTim Murphy, Coordinator, Trash Free Potomac Watershed Initiative, Alice Ferguson Foundation

As I watch the drops of rain fall at the farm today, I am reminded that every molecule of water on the earth has always been here. It exists in our waterways, has seeped into the earth, resurfaced for our needs, and evaporated into the air, only to return again as rain. Refilling my 52 oz water jug from the tap supplied by our well, I start to wonder about all the places these molecules of water might have been.

The 2nd Annual Faith in our Watershed Month is a program sponsored by the Alice Ferguson Foundation. We are encouraging faith communities to consider where our water comes from and the gift it is to all the people of the earth. 2/3 of our body weight is water, making the presence of water the primary factor of human viability. The essential message is that how we treat our water will have a long-term impact on our survival. The actions we are calling for are:

  1. Inspiring your faith community through messages during worship or organized educational activities. We at the Alice Ferguson Foundation are ready as a resource for any programming you want to do.
  2. Take Action by cleaning up the trash in your area. Cleanup activities are listed year round on our Trash Network: trashnetwork.fergusonfoundation.org. You can even organize your own cleanup and list it on the network as well. We can take you through every step. Our Adopt A Litter Can program involves taking ownership of a litter can that we provide, to put in a place that is often littered. This program is getting popular, and proving to be an exceptional solution.
  3. Raise Awareness by posting our litter campaign materials. We can provide you with free promotional materials that are proven to reduce littering.

For more information on Faith in our Watershed Month, contact us: [email protected]

Mallows Bay Cleanup Volunteers Remove 4.84 Tons of Trash

May 13th, 2016

Mallows Bay Cleanup, Photo by Adirenne FarfallaThe 28th Annual Potomac River Watershed Cleanup was April 16, 2016. AFF supported hundreds of cleanups all over the region from DC, MD, VA, to WV. Among the cleanup sites was Mallows Bay. Mallows Bay has recently passed the nomination process to become a National Marine Sanctuary and will be entering the next phase of designation involving a highly participatory and transparent public review process. 

Over 150 people volunteered at the cleanup, removing a total of 4.84 tons of trash!

Representing AFF were staff members Karen Jensen Miles, Adrienne Farfalla and Board of Directors Member Liz Theobalds. The site leader at Mallows Bay was Sammy Orlando from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Also in attendance was Charles County Commissioner Ken Robinson, Tom Roland. Chief of Parks & Grounds, Don Shomette, author of Ghost Fleet of Mallows Bay, Susan Langley, Chief Underwater Archaeologist for the State of Maryland, Mary Groves with MD DNR Smallwood State park, Nick Kuttner with the Potomac Riverkeeper Network, Charlie Stek, Chair of the Mallows Bay- Potomac River Community group, Dave Howe and the team from Institute of Maritime History, Judy Lathrop’s Atlantic Kayak Company, and the Nanjemoy Fire and Rescue team. These volunteers freely engaged the cleanup participants in wonderful stories about the sunken vessels and ecological treasures in the bay.

Tim Emhoff from Nanjemoy Creek and Adrienne Farfalla from the Alice Ferguson Foundation lead education programs with fourth grade students from Gale-Bailey Elementary School after the cleanup on activities such as; Who Polluted the Potomac, and Trash Timeline.

Volunteers Sweep Up the Shoreline at Oxon Cove Park

December 7th, 2015

Cleanup Chronicles, December 6, 2015

Another successful cleanup was held on Sunday, December 6th, at Oxon Cove Park. Twenty five volunteers enjoyed the sunshine and came out to help on this fall Sunday.

It was an adventure every step of the way. We all met in the parking lot, to be escorted to the shoreline by a tractor wagon. It was a scenic, slightly bumpy ride through endless fields and bare fall trees. The shoreline of the Potomac River offered a unique view of Alexandria, Virginia and the District of Columbia cityscapes. Together, we removed 23 bags of trash from the watershed, including a large plastic crate and an old, broken fishing pole. I was inspired by the words of fellow volunteers when I asked what they were finding. “We are finding a lot of Styrofoam. I am never buying Styrofoam again!” said Khara, volunteering with her daughter who is a high school student in Virginia.

“There are so many food wrappers; we should really be considering biodegradable options… You can learn a lot about people from the trash,” said Erik, a volunteer with Campfire Scouts. Erik said, “This is a great activity for kids because it is so simple, and it gets them outside.”

A group of Bowie State students were strongly represented. “It was something we could do together as a group.”

Ranger Stephanie Marrone was our cleanup leader. Marrone is very knowledgeable about the history of the park and is a wonderful steward of the land.

Thank you for volunteering! A cleanup saves animals, improves water quality and beautifies the park. I highly encourage everyone to participate in a trash cleanup; it is an eye opening experience.

Join us for the next Shoreline Sweep Up on January 3rd, 2016. Contact Hannah at [email protected] or by phone at 202.417.3524 with questions or to volunteer.

If you would like to learn more about Oxon Cove Park and Oxon Hill Farm, please check out this article from the National Parks Magazine!

Volunteer for Fall Cleanup at Chapman State Park, November 7

October 22nd, 2015

AFF is pleased to have formed a partnership with Volunteer Maryland, an AmeriCorpsChapman State Park program. We now have a Volunteer Maryland Coordinator on staff to help establish a more robust volunteer program throughout the Foundation.

Hannah Seligmann served as an intern earlier this year, helping to organize the Potomac River Watershed Annual Cleanup. She will be setting up area cleanups and helping to organize other volunteer opportunities around Hard Bargain Farm, as well.

The first of her efforts includes a cleanup at Chapman State Park on November 7, from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Stay for the whole time or come out for an hour, every effort helps! Student service learning hours will be awarded.

For questions, contact Hannah at [email protected] or 301.292.5665 x216

Inaugural Partnership with the District’s Green Zone Environmental Program

October 22nd, 2015
Education team members from the Trash Initiative and HBF joined forces this summer GZEPwhile working with the Green Zone Environmental Program (GZEP). GZEP is an initiative funded and administered by the District’s Department of Employment Services and the District’s Department of Energy and the Environment. GZEP is one of the largest green jobs training programs for youth, ages 14 to 24, in the nation. This summer, AFF hosted 111 GZEP youth and 19 chaperones at Hard Bargain Farm to further their mission to work on projects that have immeasurable sustainability impacts.
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During their visit, the youth learned and created solutions to combat litter in their communities. They kicked off the day by heading down the river bank to pick up trash and experience the impacts of litter pollution in the watershed. Educators from AFF discussed who is responsible for the litter in the watershed and facilitated discussions and solutions. GZEP youth were challenged to create their own litter prevention campaign. They created some catchy slogans, such as: “Stop Pollution. That’s the Revolution”, “Litter Gives Me Jitters!”, “Drop That Trash! That’s Your A**”, “Littering is a reflection of who you are…think about it!”. Everyone went home with tools to help keep their communities clean, including a “Trash Kit” that contained a tote bag, gloves, water bottles or tumbler, and recycling bags.